Gold humanism essay

An essential feature of religious experience across many cultures is the intuitive feeling of God's presence. More than any rituals or doctrines, it is this experience that anchors religious faith, yet it has been largely ignored in the scientific literature on religion.

"... [Dr. Wathey's] book delves into the biological origins of this compelling feeling, attributing it to innate neural circuitry that evolved to promote the mother-child bond...[He] argues that evolution has programmed the infant brain to expect the presence of a loving being who responds to the child's needs. As the infant grows into adulthood, this innate feeling is eventually transferred to the realm of religion, where it is reactivated through the symbols, imagery, and rituals of worship. The author interprets our various conceptions of God in biological terms as illusory supernormal stimuli that fill an emotional and cognitive vacuum left over from infancy. 

These insights shed new light on some of the most vexing puzzles of religion, like:

Petrarch collected his letters into two major sets of books called Epistolae familiares (" Letters on Familiar Matters ") and Seniles (" Letters of Old Age "), both of which are available in English translation. [31] The plan for his letters was suggested to him by knowledge of Cicero 's letters. These were published "without names" to protect the recipients, all of whom had close relationships to Petrarch. The recipients of these letters included Philippe de Cabassoles , bishop of Cavaillon ; Ildebrandino Conti , bishop of Padua ; Cola di Rienzo , tribune of Rome; Francesco Nelli , priest of the Prior of the Church of the Holy Apostles in Florence ; and Niccolò di Capoccia , a cardinal and priest of Saint Vitalis . His "Letter to Posterity" (the last letter in Seniles ) [32] gives an autobiography and a synopsis of his philosophy in life. It was originally written in Latin and was completed in 1371 or 1372 - the first such autobiography in a thousand years (since Saint Augustine ). [33] [34]

The modern Christmas tree tradition dates back to Western Germany in the 16th century. They were called " Paradeisbaum " ( paradise trees ) and were brought into homes to celebrate the annual Feast of Adam and Eve on DEC-24. 4   They were first brought to America by German immigrants about the year 1700. Christmas trees became popular among the general . population about 1850 and have remained so ever since. 2 President Franklin Pierce (1804-1869) arranged to have the first Christmas tree in the White House, during the mid-1850's. President Calvin Coolidge (1885-1933) started the National Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony on the White House lawn in 1923. 4 Today, the Christmas Tree has become accepted by most Christians, by people of other faiths, and for those who do not follow an organized religion. It has become a popular late-December tradition and part of our present-day culture. Christmas Trees grace households and office buildings alike. The trees take on a variety of shapes, sizes, and costs. Both the Christian and secular worlds have embraced traditional green firs, beautiful white flocked trees, and even pre-lit artificial Christmas trees for those who have allergic reactions to live trees. As Gail Quick, University of South Carolina - Beaufort 's Dean of University Relations, commented on the occasion of a community tree-lighting ceremony.: "This Christmas event every year is the glue that holds this community together - this and the July 4th fireworks. This always makes me feel good. Some of us still believe in Santa Claus ." 6

Gold humanism essay

gold humanism essay

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